What's Biting

As Canada's next Ultimate Fishing Town, Gananoque is proud to be home to more then 20 species of popular sport fish and over 60 varieties of bait and rough fishes.

Below, we have listed some of the more common fish caught in the area.

Largemouth Bass

Largemouth Bass

The largemouth is an olive green fish, marked by a series of dark, sometimes black, blotches forming a jagged horizontal stripe along each flank. The upper jaw (maxilla) of a largemouth bass extends beyond the rear margin of the orbit.

Smallmouth Bass

Smallmouth Bass

The smallmouth bass is generally brown (seldom yellow) with red eyes, and dark brown vertical bands, rather than a horizontal band along the side. There are 13–15 soft rays in the dorsal fin. The upper jaw of smallmouth bass extends to the middle of the eye.

Rock Bass

Rock Bass

The rock bass, also known as the rock perch, goggle-eye, or red eye is a species of freshwater fish. They are similar in appearance to smallmouth bass but are usually quite a bit smaller. The average rock bass is between 6-10 inches, and they are rarely over a pound.

Walleye

Walleye

Walleyes are largely olive and gold in colour. The dorsal side of a walleye is olive, grading into a golden hue on the flanks. The olive/gold pattern is broken up by five darker saddles that extend to the upper sides. The colour shades to white on the belly.

Muskellunge (Muskie)

Muskellunge (Muskie)

Muskies closely resemble the Northern Pike and American pickerel in both appearance and behavior. They have an elongated body, flat head and dorsal, pelvic and anal fins set far back on the body. Muskie are typically 28–48 inches long and weigh 5–36 pounds.

Northern Pike

Northern Pike

Northern pike are most often olive green, shading from yellow to white along the belly. The flank is marked with short, light bar-like spots and there are a few to many dark spots on the fins. Sometimes the fins are reddish.

Yellow Perch

Yellow Perch

Yellow perch look similar to the European perch, but are paler and more yellowish, with less red in the fins. They have six to eight dark, vertical bars on their sides.

Channel Catfish

Channel Catfish

The Channel Catfish is olive-brown to slate-blue on the back and sides, shading to silvery-white on the belly. Typically, numerous small, black spots are present, but may be obscured in large adults.

Lake Sturgeon

Lake Sturgeon

The sturgeons back and sides are olive-brown to grey and the belly is white. It also has dark brown or grey fins with a single dorsal fin far back near the caudal fin. They have a heavy, torpedo-shaped body with very tough skin and a prominent row of bondy plates or sheilds.

Bluegill

Bluegill

The bluegill is has darkened spot on the posterior edge of the gills and base of the dorsal fin. The sides of its head and chin are a dark shade of blue. It has a yellowish breast and abdomen, with the breast of the breeding male being a bright orange.

Bowfin

Bowfin

The most distinctive characteristic of the bowfin is its very long dorsal fin consisting of 145 to 250 rays, and running from mid-back to the base of the tail. The caudal fin is a single lobe, though heterocercal. They can grow up to 109 centimetres (43 in) in length, and weigh 21.5 lbs.

Sunfish

Sunfish

The Sunfish is blue-green in color on its back and sides with yellow-flecked bony-ridge scales called ctenoid scales, as well as yellow coloration on the ventral sides. They also have a dark spot located near the back end of the dorsal fin, the bases of the anal fins and on the ear plate .

Carp

Carp

The body of the Carp is robust and compressed, olive greenish on the back, fading to yellowish on the lower and under side; the lower
tins are reddish. Coloration is variable and is influenced by age, nutrition, season of the year, sexual condition, character of the water in which the fish lives and other conditions of the environment.

American Eel

American Eel

The American Eel is a brownish, elongated fish normally growing up to 1 metre in length and weighing up to 1.5 kg, with a single continuous dorsal fin that joins the caudal and anal fins. They have a thick skin that can secrete large amounts of a protective slimy mucous.